Sunday, March 22, 2015

Gallery of photographs processed in New55's Monobath

Here is a gallery with just a few of the excellent examples we have by using the Monobath.  All were scanned on an Epson V750 in automatic mode. Large files have been uploaded and you really should click on them once or twice to view them full size. Enjoy.

And you can buy R5 here.  

R3 processed TMY 


Efke 25 4x5. Ted McLelland

Ilford Pan F Plus  D Fyler

Ilford Pan F Plus R Crowley

TMX 120 D Fyler

TMX 120 D Fyler

TMX 120 D Fyler

TMX 120 D Fyler

TMX 120 D Fyler

TMX 120 (crop)

TMX 120 

TMY 135 R Crowley This was a lost roll, unprocessed for 20 years.

Tri X 6x7 R Crowley

A very old roll of Pan X 120 found in a flea market TLR and processed in R3

18 comments:

bjarte said...

Any plans of offering a powdered mix for the international market, or is there any liquid components to the mix?

cafe selavy said...

I am sending a link to this to every photographer I know who does not shoot b&w film because of processing. I will send it to every photo student in digital photography courses at the college. Good stuff.

Bill

Dave Re said...

This is interesting. If I understand correctly from other reading, R3 yields box speed, typically (the New55 blog mentions within a stop)?

The R3 that's sold by New55 is a concentrate or a ready to use dilution? Just trying to get a feel for how many rolls I'd get out of a 1L bottle.

Bob Crowley said...

Right. I use R3 straight out of the bottle at 80f and I process 3 120 films from a bottle at least.

Since there is no actual develop-fix time, the only way to modulate speed is with temperature. High temperatures push the process a stop or so. 80f is about normal speed. I rate Tri-X at 320 and get normal negatives though I could warm things up a bit to get to 400. The Pan-F is right on the money. Efke is gone but was also a normal result for me.

For tray developing, get a sandwich container with a lid at the supermarket, put about 1cm of R3 in (warm, even very warm) and into the dark bag. The in the bag you can slip one or two 4x5 sheet films in and just wait about two minutes with the cover on. That way the ammonia smell is nearly zero and the temperature is maintained. I've had excellent success with this technique and it is fast - the whole set up and process is only about 10 minutes and then ready to dry and scan.

Łukasz Majewski said...

Hi Bob,
Do you have any dealers in Europe?

Or maybe there is possibility to be one of them?

This is my mail: lukaszmajewski@me.com

If you could anwer me.

Thank you,
Lukasz Majewski

Anonymous said...

There is the troublesome fact that monobaths do not work well. This is known. I for one would never process film this way if I went back to film for some reason.

jannx said...

I've reposted the link to the blog posting in two pools at flickr dedicated to film photography.

About the comment 'monobaths do not work well' I've developed conventionally, stand, semi stand, refrigerated, two developers etc. This monobath is for specific purposes and I will use it as one more development tool. It will be a great technique for the "lo-fi" and art photography as well as students needing an easy entry to film development.

jannx said...

I've reposted the link to the blog posting in two pools at flickr dedicated to film photography.

About the comment 'monobaths do not work well' I've developed conventionally, stand, semi stand, refrigerated, two developers etc. This monobath is for specific purposes and I will use it as one more development tool. It will be a great technique for the "lo-fi" and art photography as well as students needing an easy entry to film development.

Rick Knight said...

I don't shoot film, but if I stopped not shooting film, I wouldn't use monobaths, because they don't work well on the film I'm not shooting.

:-|

Sorry for the snark.

Personally, I can't wait to try this…but it's currently sold out.

photonutz said...

Just out of curiosity when will the R# Monobath be available again?

Anonymous said...

Who are these people who say this is high contrast? I think that first shot is fine. Very fine, in fact.

Pat Morrissey said...

These look great - however with my first batch of 120 Tri-X in R3 I had a bad case of bromide streaking. I gave brief agitation for bubbles at the start and then stood the film for 10 mins at 27C in a film tank. Any suggestions for overcoming this would be welcome.

Bob Crowley said...

All I can say is that we recommend on the label that you do not agitate. I've done maybe 75 120s so far using a Paterson reel and tank (cheap one). I just fill it up with some extra R3, and wait. The ammonia is such a good wetting agent that I haven't seen bubbles. There is a Tri-X example on 120 on this page that I shot with the P67 and 105 of some leaves.

I suppose that in all cases above I used plenty of liquid to cover the reel with extra, and made sure it was good and warm. Aside from that one thing I noticed was that too strong ammonia sometimes made things a bit streaky but we are careful to keep to the 5% needed in our mix.


Others have reported good results with continuous agitation. I've never tried it.

Most cases of streaks I have heard of people agitated or inverted.

As always, your mileage may vary. ;)

Wadeevans said...

When is this going to be available in the UK?

Nic said...

Any estimates on how much film the one liter bottle will develop? As in how many rolls of 120 could I expect before exhaustion?

Anthony Roman said...

Reader's may want to see other examples of home processed film developed using R3 monobath on Flickr under the group named R3 monobath.

Anthony Roman said...

Here is the link
http://flickr.com/groups/2772184@N25

Steve Cope said...

This looks great but has the question about UK sales been answered yet?