Friday, July 15, 2011

Don't forget about R3

All of the attention on NEW55 is good, but what about Ilford PanF+ processed in a nice warm R3 monobath? Or what about R4?  It's easy to do, and about the lowest cost high quality field processable negative result you can get. Photo credit DF.

12 comments:

Anonymous said...

Luke Skywalker says R2 prefers a dip in a nice warm monobath of Imperial sprocket wash.

Then again there's no accounting for taste.

Anonymous said...

Have you ever tried monobath 438 on Efke 25 or Ilford Pan F? The formula was originally optimised for use on Panatomic X, but since that is not produced any longer I am a bit curious to see how the formula would work on more modern films. Personally, I haven´t gotten to try it out yet.

Bob Crowley said...

Please do and report the result. There are many monobaths to choose from. Of course all of Polaroid's product line used a monobath of one sort or another, so perhaps they are the unpublished king of monobaths. The formula for T55 is just a developer, a solvent, and a fixer, with an added pH booster, like many we have tried.

I always used R3 even though I have the time and materials to use "better" processing. I have become so used to it and have upped the processing temp a bit to 80 degrees, and that gives me a very fine negative, even with TMX.

Anonymous said...

"Unpublished kings of monobaths" Haha, I can agree with that. I find it especially intriguing how Polaroid managed to developed reagent formulae for colour film. Hell, they even managed to do it with slide film (Polaroid 46 roll film, Polapan, Polagraph, Polablue 35mm, etc). I would imagine developing a colour monobath to be much more challenging than for black and white, considering the fact that there are dyes in the film.

I have recently been trying to find a book written by one John D. Plumadore called "Color monobath development". Searching around the web, I have only managed to find patents that have been claimed on the subject - but not many books. I was hoping that the one written by Plumadore might spread some light on the subject, but it is very difficult to find a copy to buy.

Bob Crowley said...

I saw the title of that book on Amazon but no where to get it. Howard Rogers worked out the color couplers for a successful color PN material that uses very complex chemical reactions in a monobath situation. Fuji FP100c produces what is essentially an instant negative and with some work could be adapted to a high quality color instant negative process. Various Eastman print films have been processed in monobaths and these have no orange mask and are closer to what the Fuji negative base and even the new Kodak scannable color negative films are like. I have done experiments with various color materials and have not come close to a good result yet.

Anonymous said...

After searching the web some more, I have found that a copy of Plumadore´s book is in the Wallace library in Rochester, New York (figures that it would be in Rochester, haha). A good monobath formula for colour film would truly be wonderful. I have done some colour processing (using the Unicolor c41 powder kit) and while the process is not too difficult, I find it to be slightly tedious and I would think that it would be impractical to try and conduct it out in the field. What kind of Negative do Fuji use, by the way?

Also, It is good to hear that you are conducting experiments. You say you have not come close to a good results yet, but what have you been getting so far? Have you been getting some sort of image off of your films?

PS: If anyone do borrow the copy found in the Wallace library, could you possibly scan it to a .pdf? Of course, if such a practice is illegal, then don´t, but I think we all could benefit from seeing what the book has to say.

Anonymous said...

Hello. I return once again (okay, that sounded more solemn than I intended). I have recently found myself obsessing slightly over the whole monobath process, but I have not gotten any time to get my hands on it, since it is difficult to acquire the necessary chemicals from abroad (I reside in Europe). I recently found this while searching the web for colour monobaths. You find the original thread I found here:

http://www.apug.org/forums/archive/index.php/t-18177-p-5.html

I don't know how useful it will be, though, for would the silver image in the film still be needed to be bleached out?

Bob Crowley said...

HC110 and Ilford fixer are available in continental Europe, and so is ammonia. It works every time, and for every black and white film I have tried. Thanks for the link - I'll take a look.

Anonymous said...

Have you ever tried RIII on fomapan?

Bob Crowley said...

I have not, but I expect it will work fine. Let us know your results! Make sure the R3 is warm.

Anonymous said...

How long does the monobath keep when mixed? Is it possible to, say, mix it and then take it out to develop film in the field?

Bob Crowley said...

When mixed with distilled water, it can last for years. It is very stable.