Wednesday, April 20, 2011

DTR and a great negative too

Although the spread is imperfect, that isn't important. Today we achieved our first true P/N on the Efke 25 negative, fully developed and cleared, sharp and artifact free except where we lacked reagent, AND, a real diffusion transfer reversal onto a receiver sheet that was prepared here out of in-production materials that were never intended for instant photography, or DTR.

It was wonderful to see those little nucleating molecules where they should be, and get a great negative, too.

This is an important result that came a little faster than I expected: The Efke looks like it got about a 1 stop boost, and the processing time was 60 seconds.   Except for a slight waviness from the very irregular reagent spread, the negative is quite even, well gradated, and extremely detailed - probably at least as detailed as original T55, and perhaps more.

16 comments:

Jason said...

This is great news. Congratulations Bob! Let me know when I can buy a box!

Peter said...

This is great news indeed. And a very happy face! Congrats with the results! I can't wait for production to start.

Bob Crowley said...

Hah!
Production is still a way off. But, it is good we have the ingredients now. One concern is the price per shot with this system.

Paulo Rodrigues said...

Congratulations. This is excellent news.

Alex said...

Awesome news!!!
Looking forward to the day when we can order some.

Eric Smith said...

Bob-
Excellent news! Great work! Do you think you'll still be exploring kickstarter to try and get more funds for the project?

Bob Crowley said...

Thanks Eric

We thought long and hard about it, and considered it might work if we had a larger group to work on this, make the video, do the supporter tracking and fulfillment, and of course use and demonstrate these new tools. Kickstarter approved the project and we still have an open account. I think Kickstarter is good for an album, or a book, or maybe a fun product where not too much has to be invented to deliver the required rewards. It's too uncertain, and we don't seem to have consensus on a final product. That may be my fault, as I really have little interest in duplication.

Aaron said...

fantastic news. very impressive result! are you rolling out the pod by hand (dough roller) or using a 4x5 back?

Bob Crowley said...

The one you see was rolled through an 8x10 processor by the hand crank method, but it might as well have been done any other way. The DTR is still not very good, has a sepia color, and needs some more tweaking. I'm very pleased with the negative.

cafe selavy said...

Heroes. That's all there is to it. No. . . genius heroes. This is fabulous.

I want to try. I'm like a kid before Christmas.

Bob Crowley said...

Well...no, not really. Just entrepreneurial R&D. This is how it is often done! We need cheerleaders to keep the faith and also convince the financiers there is a real market.

Thanks!

Man on Fire said...

congratulations :) This is truly exciting. I came here to read back on updates, because on flickr someone mentioned you were close to a finished product. And boy, you really are.

Bob Crowley said...

Hey Man,

Thanks. All we need is another $225,000 and we will have it out in a jiffy. Seriously, we know how to do it now - but we still need to attain some kind of production capability, which we are actively working on! Check back in 10 days.

aldobranti said...

can we remember when ppl are concerned about price that the effective cost of PN55 was a *fraction* of the cost of tank developed once the advantage of onsite delivery was costed in

Justin Parker said...

As I read through this blog now from start to finish, with Rott's book, Ansel Adam's Polaroid Land book, and Monobath Manual all in the mail now... I am curious what your receiver sheet for this is? I know you said inkjet printer paper was a fail. Does RC paper that has been somehow treated beforehand work maybe? I am tempted to try with film on film, but perhaps the emulsions would intermingle too much?

Bob Crowley said...

Glossy print paper, fixed out, works fine. Soak an contrast in some fixer for about 20 minutes and wash it. That leaves enough residual silver to make it work very well. I would use glossy paper for this. You might have sticking and will have to add a release agent. The monobath has to be mixed into a strong concentration and with a thickener unless you don't mind some liquid running out. The sharpness of the DTR depends on the reagent staying put while the process goes on, of course.

Get Meese and James' book on photographic manufacturing science. It is excellent. That and the others are good reading.