Thursday, July 29, 2010

Further results with Reagent III

Well!  TMX seems to have done nicely with Reagent III here.

A long process time was used by photog DF who exposed this roll in the Spring and processed it this week at about 75f for perhaps 12 minutes.  What you are looking at is in as-scanned condition, M645 and the F1.9.

Film photography has never been easier, and just look at the quality when you click and zoom in.  It may not be "instant" but it is quick, and easy, and the results defy old notions about "monobaths" completely.

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

Sky mid tones against the relatively contrasty branches are nice.

Peter de Groot said...

Hmmm I might try monobath myself. Seems handy if you are on the road but you don't want to bring to many chemicals. I just wonder, how long will the negative last?

Bob Crowley said...

The negative will last as long as any negative, likely 100s of years.

Michael said...

This sounds interesting. Could you do a simple post how to post? Mixing and using. I can develop a roll in Diafine but I am having a slight issue getting my brain around the whole monobath workflow. Thanks for the research.

Bob Crowley said...

http://new55project.blogspot.com/2010/06/rapid-reagent-formula-used-below.html is the mix instructions. You should get some pH strips.

As far as processing, load the film into the tank, add the solution, wait a few minutes, then dump it out (save it because it is good for more) and then wash the film normally, or, you can use sodium sulfite to get any hypo out quicker.

I suppose I could do a post showing graduates mixing liquids together sometime, but if you read the post referenced above, I am sure you can see all you need is developer, fixer and the right pH. That was the "secret" for decades, that eluded the so-called monobath movement of prior to Old Pol. However, get Haist's Monobath Manual - easy to find - if you want to know alternative formulas. Our formula (based on Donald Quall's recipe)is selected to be compatible with a thickener, be fast acting, and use relatively common photo chemicals.

Michael said...

My previous post didn't make too much sense now that I re-read it. Wifeus interuptus.

I missed the mix article. RSS must have had a bad day then.

And I missing a few puzzle pieces to make a full picture. Off to Google and Amazon.

Saw this today too - http://www.the-impossible-project.com/projects/8x10