Tuesday, April 6, 2010

Fuji FP-100C Negative Reclamation

NEWS: An all-new Instant Film is being developed. You can be a part of it at New55 and participating in the Kickstarter effort, and by telling others on Facebook, Twitter and in forums. We really need your help on this. Countless photographers have enjoyed and made use of the information here, now we ask you to pitch in on this historic and important effort.  Please go here now!

Thank you

Bob Crowley


Here's the sequence I use  - shoot, peel and let the negative dry completely. I don't touch it or try to clean it or rinse it.

Trim the negative and place it face down on clean glass


Use good quality gaffer's tape, all around, overlap a little, making sure the seal is very complete so bleach won't get underneath.

Three layers of folded paper towel are placed over the back of the negative now

And add some thick bleach - not too much, just wet it all over.PDATE UPDATE - Tobias Feltus has improved this process by using THICK BLEACH which works in a shorter time and does not require the pressing and waiting. I will post the exact THICK BLEACH brand when I find it. in the meantime, continue...

Lay a plastic bag on top and using a print roller, spread the bleach, pressing the soaked paper towel firmly onto the back of the negative.

Some weighty objects on top! I like to wait a couple of minutes.




Remove the weights and the plastic. Swipe off the black gob with the wet paper towel - it comes off very easily as the bleach has had plenty of time to react with the black mask and dissociate the material. I don't try to get all of it now because the sodium hypochlorite remaining is minute and scrubbing can scratch the substrate.

Clean the rest with glass cleaner, lightly and completely. This is a better way for final cleanup, after the bleach has softened all the goo. A nice shiny surface without residue. PLEASE DO NOT WRITE ME SAYING THAT CHLORINE GAS IS PRODUCED HERE - IT IS NOT.  A very small amount of chloramine may be produced. This is what is used in swimming pools. Now back to the program:

Peel up the tape carefully and enjoy your scanner-ready results. Check out the detail and sharpness! This is easy, and fun. Enjoy Fuji FP-100C!Thanks to Tobias Feltus for first alerting me to this process. Also check out THIS LINK.

91 comments:

Leandro said...

Thanks for posting this! I had starting looking into this about a month or so ago when I ran across a flickr discussion group talking about it. I like your steps, nice and concise, definitely seems less messy. Some other posts I read said they had gently washed the emulsion side with cold water first to clear any chemistry gunk left on it. Did you find that necessary?

Bob Crowley said...

I have had very bad luck trying to wash off the goo and always lose some emulsion, damage it, or produce reticulation. No idea how long the negatives will last simply dried, but plenty long enough for a high resolution scan! The only problems come from uneven reagent spread, and that rarely happens with the smaller FP-100C. I did have streaks with FP-100c45, but cured that by pulling slowly - quite slowly. Since this is a self-terminating process, slow pulls don't result un uneven development.

Seriously I have reclaimed some of these that have been sitting around for months already - no worries. Use the glass cleaner! Let the bleach soften the black goo, but don't scrub. No reason you can't "process" three or more of these at once on a single pane of glass.

Zoe Wiseman said...

brilliant!

Bob Crowley said...

Alright, good fun with Fuji! Today it is back to New55.

Joe Orsillo said...

excellent! thanks so much for posting your method. i too have tried the wash and fix, then bleach method with nasty results. will try your method as it does seem much cleaner.

Peter said...

I have to try this. I shot a fuji fp 100c45. Now I hope I didn't throw away the negative. Ah well maybe I'll shoot another one instead.

Philip said...

PS From previous post - rescanned Fuji FP 100B neg - cropped and levels adjusted in PS
http://www.flickr.com/photos/philipgreene/4510151593/

Bob Crowley said...

Philip

Thanks for that. I did post a 100b reclaimed on Jan 26 here. The color material is a lot sharper and the tones don't reverse. The 100b "negative" isn't really a negative here. How do you process it? Normal time, or something else?

Philip said...

Hi Bob,

I processed that negative and a few others differently than the method you used. I actually just used a paper towel and bleach and rubbed off the backing and rinsed in water. I'm still in the learning experimental stage here because there are a number of methods being described on the web. So I want to try what you have described above.

The first version I posted almost reminds me of a tin type and the second looks more like a better representation of the original print.

But one question I have for you is what you do for color adjustments after scanning a color negative - when inverted mine are very reddish/sepia looking - which is interesting as an effect but I'd like to know if I can reproduce the colors close to the print?

I'll post a link to the latest color negative I took today.

Philip

Philip said...

PS Here's the link to the Fuji neg I was just describing:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/philipgreene/4511570052/

Anonymous said...

I think this is the best version of the process as it preserves the detail without touching the sensitive part. Excellent clear instructions too.

Laura Allen Photography said...

Great idea and I'm captivated! Have been trying this myself on Fuji FP 100c. I'm having problems with the bleach it doesn't seem to be doing anything to the backing? as a result its not softening. Any ideas? Thanks L

Bob Crowley said...

Laura

Check that your bleach is fresh. Old bleach turns to water if left around without the cap sealed tightly. Oxy clean and that type of bleach won't work as far as I know - you need Clorox in the white plastic jug. I try to buy it in the small container because a short while after opening it loses its strength.

The scanned positive from FP-100C is also quite respectable. Fuji is now branding their Instax camera as Polaroid - if Polaroid is on the ball they will start doing the same for the packfilms.

Laura Allen Photography said...

Thanks for the info Bob, I'll keep you posted. You're a star

L

Bob Crowley said...

I found that a water rinse resulted in some green coming off the negative. The water was greenish. I gave up on immersing the negative at all but Aaron's results are so good I may try again.

As far as scanning, I use an epson 750 with the epson software, or the Silverfast AI that came with it. I see little difference actually. The native scan comes up orange but is easily corrected at the scanner by adding some blue. If you look at my photostream on flikr - combustionage - you will see the native orange scan then the corrected one. The image of Alisha here on the blog was scanned in Silverfast AI using the Mitsibishi film preset - don't ask me what that means, or does. I am clueless and like a monkey pushing buttons with this apparently powerful software. They say it can do a double scan to enhance dynamic range but I have yet to find that feature.

I do like the alisha image overall when full screen. As a thumbnail it looks unsaturated. No wonder everything we see on TV and the web is so cranked color-wise. Moderation is a relief. black and white even better because the delivery medium can't ruin it as much.

Joe Orsillo said...

Hey Bob,
Just wanted to share my results using your clearing method and 100C45. I am really liking what I get, and its much more reliable than the wash and fix method. My only issue now is the reagent streaks on the negative. It seems that no matter how slowly I pull I still get the streaks. Do you have any recommendations?
http://decluttr.com/4528762689

Bob Crowley said...

Joe


Yes I do - my suggestion is to take a closer look at the image you have produced! Wow! The filmy streaks certainly would be missed in this instance.

Seriously, I do find that pulling through the rollers very slowly is a factor, and so is freshness. Short-dated film seems to have a little less goop and that may be why Alisha for instance is streak-free. I have a PA-45 and yesterday looked for a 550 at the photo show, but came up empty handed. Also I never get streaks with the smaller material in the 405 back or a packfilm camera. It may be Fuji provides plenty of reagent knowing it will eventually dry. Still, the rate of pull is going to be key - maybe we need motorized rollers out of old Instax cameras?

I suppose washing the reagent off like Aaron does is probably what to do when you get a pull with streaks. I have failed at the wash technique and haven't had luck with fixers, brushes, fingers etc., but you might. There are still many things yet to be done with this Fuji FP-100C material.

Moopheus said...

"They say it can do a double scan to enhance dynamic range but I have yet to find that feature."

The scanner supports it, but the Silverfast software it comes with does not--it's a feature you have to pay extra for. Vuescan software does support it. It's a very helpful feature, especially with dense transparency film, like Kodachrome.

Anonymous said...

This is great I can't wait to try it. One thing to keep in mind though is that window cleaner usually contains high levels of ammonia. Mixing bleach and ammonia is bad bad bad. Its very harmful to the skin and creates chlorine gas which can severely damage your lungs and even kill you. be very very careful when using these 2 chemicals together. Perhaps a good rinse with water between the bleach and ammonia is a good idea. also removing all bleach contaminated items from the area before using the ammonia would be smart so it doesn't mix anywhere on your surface or in the air.

Bob Crowley said...

Thanks. There is chlorine gas present from the bleach alone. The very small amount released afterwards is minute and is about the amount you would find in a public pool. Certainly do not ingest it. Ammonia isn't the only caustic chemical that will liberate chlorine upon mixing with sodium hypochlorite (bleach). You should be careful of course but do not get alarmed. If you are sensitive to bleach, do not perform this process.

Anonymous said...

BOB - what got you banned from FLIKR? Tony

Bob Crowley said...

I'm the one that canceled my account. A forum moderator told an abusive member to send his abuse directly to me via email, if you can believe it. Not a place I want to be.

Josh Allen said...

Hi, Thanks so much for posting this! Do you think it would work with a polaroid negative? A 669 or ID-UV?

Bob Crowley said...

Josh

I haven't tried it with anything except FP-100c, FP-100C4X5 (both good results) FP-100B (failure), but it might work with others. The process is so easy and quick that you might give it a try and let us know what you found!

Bruce said...

Lovely guide! One question; is picture 3 showing the wrong side of the neg facing up on the glass? (I can see that paper backing down one side). I'm not quite sure which side you need to clean is it the one that was not in contact with the print?

Bob Crowley said...

That's the mask you see, facing up. The black material keeps light from getting to the negative after you pull it.

That's what is taken off with the bleach, so it must face up so you can get at it. Protect the emulsion side, which is face down, from anything that might damage or scratch it. Clean and dry the glass and make sure the negative is fully dry. It gets taped firmly at the perimeter to seal it from bleach, which will attack your emulsion.

Don't stick anything to the emulsion and you will be fine, and not lose details.

All the images are in two sizes, thumbnails, as shown, and full screen. Click on them to see the details.

Anonymous said...

Are you COMBUSTION AGE? And were you or were you not deleted from FLIKR????? VERY SUSPICIOUS

Craig said...

Mr. Crowley,
Been diving back into film/analog lately and am very supportive of what you've been doing and working toward. At some point, I'd like to help test (may get to work on the recent reagent recipe.) Just found my first couple of packs of FP-100c last week and have had a great amount of fun with just the first few exposures. Thanks for keeping this information alive and in the public domain.

Now for some emulsion lifts.

My first instant (Fuji) neg:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/agrho/4778263044/in/set-72157624334281295/

paco said...

he is stranger who in all this content does not name not one time to the inventor of the process, that has shared with all you this discovery.

http://www.flickr.com/groups/polaroid_/discuss/72157618948828028/

Thanks,
Paco Rocha

www.pacorocha.com

Bob Crowley said...

Paco


Are you saying you came up with this? What about Tobias? We aren't sure who first tried it. but I can tell you that it is still being refined, and brought to a new level, even now.

paco said...

Hi Bob:

Tobias is a good frien of mine, and his kind of work is perfect for this technique.

Ok, my first publication was in spanish magazine "Dslr Magazine" official. And the first upload in flickr is for my photo process explain on 29-may-2009 (http://www.flickr.com/groups/polaroid_/discuss/72157618948828028/) opens the process to the world.

the first photo processed:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/pacorocha/3575641036/

And the official DSLR MAGAZINE web
http://www.dslrmagazine.com/analogico/tecnicas-de-fotografia-analogica/fp100b-negativo-utili-2.html

Bob Crowley said...

Paco

I see your attempt at getting a negative from FP100B and this tutorial of course is about FP100C. What I am curious about now is the negative - did you get a usable monochrome negative? We have not been able to, even after many tries.

Please teach us how to get that. We want it!!!!

Thanks

Bob

paco said...

Bob, the bleach process is valid for the two fuji instant films:
fp 100c (render colour negative)
You can obtain best results if process the negative sheet before bleach with standard c-41 or ra-4 chemicals
fp 100b (render b/w negative)
You can obtain best results with selenium toner (i.e. kodak selenium at 1:3)it is a form to increase the density of the negative. the other form is to resign to the quality of the copy in paper and to reduce the time of developing in the normal process to obtain more silver density in the goop (because you stop the silver transfer from the goop to the copy)

Isn´t valid for fp3000b

paco said...

Normally, you can positive a little dense negative in a variable contrast paper with a maximum contrast level of 5, or full magenta in a color head enlarger

Bob Crowley said...

Please show us an example of the selenium toner negative! I'd like to post it - send it to my email address - you can find it above on the right.

paco said...

can`t find your mail. In this moment my polaroid 110 packfilm modified is with fp100c. and my polaroid 405 chasis is with fp100c. in a few days i`ll send to you this test

Bob Crowley said...

It's right up at the top right, "spamless communication method". Go there and find my email address.

I want to see your old selenium toned FP-100B, not anything new, so you don't need to make any new shot - just the old one will be better, more historical.

Anonymous said...

blah blah blah

paco said...

upload to flickr a scan with an old failed process with selenium (last year). Scanned in negative colour mode and with tone curves in lightroom to increase contrast. The Dmax with selenium obtains a very slow increase of Dmax. in fp100b dry negatives.
In this year i can´t make more tests (two disc hernias in my column have had me unemployed the first months of the year) My last idea uncompleted was make a test with chromium intensifier (http://www.usask.ca/lists/alt-photo-process/2002/jun02/0108.htm) but i can`t do.

paco said...

sorry. the scan....

http://www.flickr.com/photos/pacorocha/4843280422/

Heiko Krause said...

Hello, I#m from Germany and I'm really flashed by the possiblities of this process but I'm wondering what kind of bleach do I have to use for being succesful. Would you discribe it a bit more detailed? Best regards.

Heiko Krause

Bob Crowley said...

Any bleach with sodium hypochlorite, also known as chlorine bleach. Clorox is a typical brand name in N America. Please let us know the name of the same thing in Germany when you get back from the store.

Heiko Krause said...

I was looking for the chemicals but wasn't very succesful. There are two options: Germany - Eau de Javel, UK - Tornado Sodium Hypochlorite (via eBay) I don't konow that much about the concentration of the Sodium-Hypochlorite that is necessary to have a process with acceptable results. Thanks in advance for any further advice:


http://www.codecheck.info/waschen_reinigen/wc_bad_reiniger/ean_4100280092019/id_387670/Eau_de_Javel_Bleichmittel.pro


http://cgi.ebay.de/Sodium-Hypochlorite-15-5-Litres-/130344120777?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_3&hash=item1e591d71c9

Bob Crowley said...

Get the Tornado, since that has what you need in it. There are toilet bowl cleaners with the same chemical in them too. Be careful, wear gloves, do not ingest any of these common household chemicals, wear eye protection, and use common sense. The more sodium hypochlorite, the less time it takes to dissolve the black backing. If we were in a big hurry we'd be using our digis, so it probably doesn't matter.

Anonymous said...

Thank you very much again, I have a son at the age of 3 and a small flat so I can't and won't buy 5 litres of the chlor bleach. Is it necessary that the bleach is highly concentrated or would a Clorox Bleach Pen Gel, 2 oz (56 g) work as well. In Germany I normally use EcoVer an ecological bleach which does not contain chlorides. It is composed of 100% Natriumpercarbonat which bleaches in it's normal as effective as the chloride bleach would do it. Would it be worth to give it a try? Thanks!

Bob Crowley said...

Natrium is sodium bicarbonate and "bleaches" by dissociating carbon which combines with oxygen, and produces carbon dioxide gas in the process. Free oxygen also reacts with nearby stains, breaking large molecules into little ones, thereby lightening them in color.

Chlorides are chlorine compounds such as table salt (sodium chloride) the principal constituent of seawater after water. Humans naturally contain a good amount of sodium chloride. Hypochlorites also reacts with oxygen in a vigorous way that breaks bonds such as paint, stains etc. When sodium hypochorite reacts it does not produce carbon dioxide gas and any chlorine atoms combine with whatever calcium, sodium, iron or other reactive element is near, which is why there is no detectable chlorine gas in the troposphere.

Ecover appears to be sodium carbonate, and therefore produces carbon dioxide when made and used.

It is not likely to work to dissolve the backing material, but you should try it, give it some time to work, and report your results.

Bob Crowley said...

Heiko - I checked the Clorox bleach pen gel and I do think that would work, if there is enough gel to cover the negative. It might be a little expensive but also might be more convenient.

The "thick bleach" that Tobias Feltus uses seems to the best he has found, and the bleach pen gel sounds similar.

Scho said...

Is the carbon backing similar to that on the old type 665 Polaroid B&W film? That would come off in a sodium sulfite solution quite readily.

Bob Crowley said...

It's some kind of polymeric mask with a precise thickness, and has a lot of black in it, but does not seem like 665, which is too bad.

ElRicardo said...

Thanks a lot for this excellent little guide!I followed these steps and found them very very convenient!
On a sidenote thou, i did wash the emulsion side from the gelly substance it has remained, mainly because i noticed it was rather cristallized (seemd like salt or sugar only much tinier) maybe because i had the polaroids sitting there for about a month or so, and it seemed to me that scanning that would render the scan opaque. Also, with warm water and gentle rub with my fingers (under running water) i didn't notice any emulsion damage at all.

Anonymous said...

It tkae me only 3 min to get it... with pure BLEACH..

Anonymous said...

Hi, am going under anonymous because my comment under my name did not show. Is this project still going? I am having fun reclaiming 4x5 c & b negs but have some questions and comments. Anonymous (however, my real name is Roy and I believe I am a member!)

Bob Crowley said...

Roy - blogger has a comment spam filter that is very good, but not perfect. It's a lot better than Wordpress, that's for sure.

Anonymous said...

I sincerly do not understand the target of this project, maybe because i do not speak english, but what does it mean " The goal is to enable the supply of a very high quality negative" ??
is maybe you mean to say "The goal is develop high quality negative in a different way"

Please do not consider me as a troll but I really find not clear the title
best regards Mike Nardini
mnardini@mail.com

Bob Crowley said...

No problem.

The goal is to provide a high quality negative that can be obtained without going back to the darkroom, or using a cumbersome changing bag.

T55 spoiled us. It produced an exceptionally sharp and detailed negative and was pretty easy to process in the field, but not perfect.

Now that is gone. Even Quickloads/Readyloads are gone! That puts us back with double dark slides and grafmatic backs. These are OK and we know how to use them, but they are not light, they are hard for new users to get the hang of, and they take a lot of time.

You can still buy boxes of sheet film and process them in the normal way with developer, fixer and wash. Great! But, that takes time.

We have tested a monobath/reagent that works with EFKE 25 to produce a high resolution, quality negative. It is a much sharper negative than the reclaimed Fuji instant negatives. Much sharper.

Now we have to put it all together into a field usable system. If it processes "instantly" like 55 did, that would be great! We might be able to do that.

Even if we cannot, we can STILL use the monobath/reagent with a standard sheet film, if we make it easy to use. We definitely can do that.

The goal is to enable the supply of a high (very high) quality negative material, that can be field-processed. No darkroom. Fast, results in a couple of minutes.

Most people (not all) are using a hybrid workflow for some of their work. Capturing the best possible image for that means, for some of us, getting a great negative.

Not only that, but young people in art schools, and all over, still have access to one of the millions of 4x5 cameras that were designed to last 100 years. I want to see them used, easily, by newcomers as well as pros, as tools for artistic expression. If that is too expensive or too difficult, it won't happen.

If we make it easy, accessible, and fun, it can happen.

It will be many years yet before digital cameras can compete with a sharp 4x5 negative.

Does this answer your question? We've already done the legwork. All the info is here in this blog and you can go out and start doing it yourself now by using monobaths with EFKE 4x5 or 120 Ilford Pan-F (great results we got still astound us).

I will post more on a new thread, but that is the answer.

Make it easy, fast, accessible to young people, and very high quality for pros, without going back to the darkroom.

Bob Crowley said...

No problem

The goal is to enable the supply of a high quality negative material that can be processed without a darkroom. Today that means changing bags and daylight tanks. That's OK, but the millions of 4x5 cameras out there won't get used much by young people that way.

We've shown the monobath formula works very well with off-the-shelf sheet films and some 120 films. Great really

Now we need to make that into a system.

Does that answer your question?

Bob Crowley said...

That last one was the short version ;-)

Anonymous said...

Bob, thanks for your kind reply
I'm starting to understand better
Mike

Bob Crowley said...

Me too.

Anonymous said...

Hi Bob, thank you so much for this post !!!
I try it with my 4x5 large format on old expired c45,
and my 3x4 polaroid pathfinder 110b on fresh films.
The results are amazing !!!

here you can see some example pictures ... http://s75.photobucket.com/home/photography_deluxe/recentuploads?view=slideshow

Only for Germany ... use Dan Klorix Hygenereiniger blaue Flaschen dm Markt.

Best regards, Roman.

Bob Crowley said...

Very nice images Roman! thanks for sharing them with us!

Anonymous said...

Amazing stuff! Thank you, thank you! Thinkng of taking this on the road (shoot for 5 days)after great results in the studio! I know the film is self terminating... but has anyone tried leaving it unpealed for days?

Thanks - Fred

Bob Crowley said...

I think you can leave it on for a day, and possibly more if the weather isn't too dry. Maybe someone will try an experiment. Shoot pull and wait three days, and report back.

Anonymous said...

http://www.flickr.com/photos/pacorocha/3587944115/in/set-72157619006319867/

15 days in my car in summer

Clifford Kiracofe said...

Paco, read your excellent and helpful article in DSLR.
Roman, nice images.
Bob, thanks for this thread and your efforts.

My first package of Fuji FP100C45 arrived today.

Anonymous said...

Thanks Clifford, I am glad to see that every day more people use my system to create new pictorial images. Sure you enjoy. I use the direct negative and positive enlarger color on paper, the results are fantastic.

Anonymous said...

Bob Crowley, I have been doing it, this way, on flat glass three or four at a time now. The tape is very important, to seal all around. Other wise, is very easy this way, to do and just wipe off when ready. But, the bleach is better fresh than old, it gets weak with time, and the fast bleach - where do you get it?

I tried the washing off method, too, it works but some water got under an edge. Long time ago tape used to lift off the back, but, this was something else? Margo.

Dan Chung said...

Has anyone seen these green splotches on their neg?

http://danchungphoto.smugmug.com/Recent-Work/New-Work/16208396_gA4bA#1234231200_KmgGB

What caused this? anybody know?

Bob Crowley said...

It looks like you got a little bit of bleach on around the edge, and on the emulsion. I got the same thing once before I started taping the negative well to glass.

E.N.M-aparate_clasice said...

I thought about not trimming the negative. Just tape it over in the stadium it is on picture 2. Would this have any negative effect.

Bob Crowley said...

You can. It might be good to make sure the goo is dried though, as it can make a mess. I see no other reason why you cannot do it. Good luck!

sol said...

Will this work the same on Fuji FP3000B?
I tried and it didn't work. The emulsion got peeled. :\

Bob Crowley said...

Yes, it does work on FP3000, but you are left with a white opaque base. Elsewhere on this blog there is an example and a discussion of it.

Anonymous said...

I have a question here...how do you store the processed negatives?

awldune said...

I find that Clorox toilet cleaner works quickly.

rzmaulana said...

Hi there Bob! was wondering, lets say i hve finger prints on my negative, is it okay to wash the emulsion side?

Bob Crowley said...

Hi

Some people do it with cold water. I've not have much luck with that, but others have.

BTW I store them in ordinary 4x5 negative sleeves and they seem perfectly fine after a year and a half.

Anonymous said...

I do not see anything like the resurection of polaroid's 55 in this at all, just a washing of the negative of some color films with the black on it. For the people with the money maybe.

peter said...

You are right. This post has not much to do with the new 55. It is a fun side track. fp 100c is not that expensive. In the Netherlands it cost about 13 euro's. Cheaper then impossible film. It is fun to experiment with.

Bob I tried it a couple of times but I haven' t been able to get the black stuff of completely. Do you have any advice? I will try it next week again with a couple of negatives at school. Make a little workshop out of it for some of my fellow students and teachers.

santiagoenprata said...

Hi Peter:

My name is paco rocha, many do not know ... or do not want to know. but the reality is that the first time this process was published on the internet did to my hand. I have never profited by it and I've shared freely with everyone through flickr and DslrMagazine online magazine. I'm in Spain, and unfortunately I have no time or inclination to go behind each one of which, since 2009, have been attributed to the invention. I'll be happy to prepare a seminar for you, your students and for those who do need and I have continued to develop the process in private because of the "no grateful" that is people. proof is that my flickr page visit only to "see the process" never see my pictures. Please contact me and may be able to make a first-hand encounter.

Peter said...

I'm in the Netherlands so a personal workshop wouldn't be convenient I think. But I will try it out tomorrow. I have 5 negatives to reclaim so I will try you way and the way it is described here. Thanks for the offer though.

Peter said...

I have done a couple now. I got everything completely. However you can just let the bleach sit on top for ten minutes. No paper towel and weights are needed. Now I need a way to get the correct colors in photoshop.

bougeottewanderlust said...

Thanks for this ! Nice, easy steps and not that much mess, tried it out and got great results :)

nicole said...

hi there, i tried all kind of polaroids out,the only success i had was with the fp 100c,it seems all the original polaroids have a different surface,as the black wont come off at all,all i do it make it shiny,thats all....somebody had more luck with the original polaroids?cheers nicole

Anonymous said...

hi there, i tried all kind of polaroids out,the only success i had was with the fp 100c,it seems all the original polaroids have a different surface,as the black wont come off at all,all i do it make it shiny,thats all....somebody had more luck with the original polaroids?cheers nicole

Mr. Crinks said...

Hi, I've been using this method (with thick bleach) and I love the results.. what I like most is that you get a very different alternative image to the print.

Anyhow, does anyone know if this process will work with the silk version of the Fuji film? I've only used the gloss so far..
Thanks!

Mama, don't take my Kodachrome said...

It doesn't take much bleach on the emulsion side to ruin it, and hot water makes it worse. Don't ask me how I know this.

Póki said...

As I know this technique started here:
www.polanoid.net/jump/?to=pictures&pid=14270
(see the comments section)

and here:
http://www.schwarzerfreitag.com/en/index.php?path=/en/books.php
page 74.

Bob Crowley said...

Even the Provivid doesn't have the remjet back. I think the links are to emulsion lifts. That's a much older technique. This is a negative reclamation technique. You could get a paper negative from all of the black and white polaroid films, suitable for a contact print, but few people ever bothered. Now that Fuji is discontinuing its pack films I expect this technique will also end.

Póki said...

Nonono:) The polanoid link shows my work done with this technique and the probably the first written description of this technique (I named it 'hipochlorite etching'), which can also be found in the book. I intended the links to Paco Rocha, who also independently discovered it, just for to clear this very tiny step in photohistory :)
Going back to FP100C production, I am sure that Fuji will discontinue it. And what will they do with the machinery? Will they destroy as Polaroid did with the pack- and LF film machinery? TIP will save the machinery? - who knows...

Bob Crowley said...

Peelapart films could go out of production in the future, so stock up if you like FP100c and support our Kickstarter effort by clicking on the link at the top of the page.